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What Kind of Jobs Can I Get?

Arizona Employment First believes that people with disabilities should have control over the kinds of work they want to do. There are many different ways to work.

Competitive Integrated Employment

This type of work means:

  • You are hired and paid directly by their employer (not by a job agency or state program)
  • You work in your community
  • You work and interact with people with and without disabilities
  • The amount of time you work each week is based on your choices, wants, and needs
  • You are paid the same and work the same number of hours as workers without disabilities doing the same job.
  • You receive at least minimum wage and have the same access to benefits as workers without disabilities doing the same job
  • If you are self-employed, you make the same amount of money someone without a disability would be making doing the same work.


Work can look different for different people.

You can be:

  • Self-Employed: You have your own business and decide your own hours and job tasks
  • Employed by Others: You work for someone else, and your boss decides your hours and job tasks


You can also decide how much you would like to work.

Options include:

  • Full-time: Working full time means working about 40 hours a week. This usually means working 8 hours per day. These jobs often have benefits and perks that other jobs do not, such as health insurance and paid vacation.
  • Part-time: Working part time means working less than 35 hours per week. These kinds of jobs often do not have as many perks or benefits as full-time jobs.
  • If you are Self-Employed, you can decide how much you work. Working less means you will make less money.


Am I Working or In Training?

Sometimes, people who have disabilities take part in training programs before working. These programs can take place in the community or in segregated centers. They can be paid or unpaid. As a trainee, you learn work-related skills to prepare you for employment. Group-supported employment (enclaves) and centered-based employment (sheltered workshops) are examples of training. Training is not a permanent job. Training exists to help you prepare for work.

Employment is a job in your community. These jobs can be full-time or part-time. People who have disabilities and people who do not have disabilities:

  • Work together,
  • Get paid the same for doing the same job,
  • Get the same benefits.

Note: This information comes from the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS)



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